10 Tips for Effective Time Management

How good is your time management by Marijan Pavisic MS SPHR

Not planning a schedule, committing to too many tasks or events, and dealing with the many life distractions can all lead to wasted time and anxiety about how to get everything done. Here are 10 tips to keep in mind as you hone your time management skills:

  1. Determine which activities are fixed vs. flexible. 
    This will vary for each individual, but some items on your schedule are fixed, meaning that they will occur at the same time each week. Others will occur occasionally or have flexibility around when they can be scheduled. Fixed events may include work hours, classes, meetings, mealtimes, church, children’s activities, and hours spent commuting. Flexible items could include time allotted for exercise, household chores, appointments and errands, entertainment, and down time.

  1. Be realistic about how much time you need. 
    Planning out your schedule can help ensure that adequate time has been budgeted for required activities. Having a plan prevents you from having to rush, and also reminds you not to spend too much time on tasks that you can accomplish quickly.

  1. Break tasks down into manageable segments. 
    Some projects are complex and involve multiple steps. Scheduling each step separately can provide a series of manageable goals to accomplish.

  1. Establish a routine. 
    A schedule provides a helpful guide, but establishing consistent habits makes it easier to maintain productivity. Just as healthy eating habits can support wellness, effective time management habits can support a sense of confidence and ease.

  1. Reward yourself. 
    Compensation for time well spent can include scheduling weekend time to ensure that you really get time to relax. If there’s something that motivates you more, use that as an incentive to reward accomplishments.

  1. Be flexible, but don’t get derailed.
    Unexpected events will always arise, and you can adjust your schedule to accommodate them by utilizing free time. After a shift in scheduled time occurs, return to your plan in order to stay on track.

  1. Group tasks to maximize efficiency.
    You can group errands by location and priority, and arrange tasks by type. Embrace multi-tasking by combining activities that work well together. For example, complete laundry while doing other household chores or homework.

  1. Listen to your body. 
    Following the natural cycles of your body can help you create an effective schedule. If you’re a morning person, for instance, you may have more energy for certain things earlier rather than later in the day. You may have a job or school schedule that doesn’t exactly match your natural rhythms, but being aware of your energy levels throughout the day can help you anticipate how much time you may need for a given activity.

  1. Don’t be afraid to delegate. 
    In work or family life, find duties that you can delegate or share with others to help alleviate your workload. While you may give up some control by sharing tasks with others, you may also discover that you have more time to focus on high-priority items and those personal goals that matter the most to you.

  1. Keep your eyes on the prize.
    Whether you’re focusing on short-term action steps or long-term goals, use these objectives for motivation. This can help you stick to your time management schedule and foster a sense of achievement.

There are many time management tools that you can use to help schedule time, from mobile apps to calendars and multi-year plans. Below, you’ll find a variety of templates with basic formatting and a professional appearance that can help you manage your personal and professional time better. Download the templates that work for you and customize them to fit your needs.

Thank You For Reading

Marijan Pavisic MS SPHR

New Jersey workers could soon get long-awaited paid sick time

Paid Sick Days

New Jersey workers could soon get long-awaited paid sick time

The New Jersey workers who have come to work sick or taken days unpaid to nurse a cold could soon receive paid sick time from their employers under a bill passed Thursday by the state Legislature.

The legislation, variations of which have been making its way through the Statehouse for years, would allow private-sector workers to accrue one hour of earned sick leave for every 30 hours worked.

They can use that time to care for themselves or a family member who is ill, to attend school conferences or meetings, or to recover from domestic violence.

The bill (A1827) passed the state Senate, 24-11, Thursday after passing the state Assembly last month.

More than a dozen New Jersey towns have put in place their own requirements, but there is no state-level law guaranteeing private-sector workers earned sick leave, and about 1.2 million workers here don’t get paid sick days.

Lower-income workers are much less likely to have paid sick leave. One study found only three in 10 workers with income below $20,000 had this benefit, while eight of every 10 workers earning $65,000 or more did.

Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat, has said he would back such a law, and this bill now heads to his desk for his signature.

The measure is opposed by business industry groups, who say small businesses will struggle to afford and conform to this one-size-fits-all approach.

HR and Finance Employees/Managers Targeted in New Scams

Heads up: In recent months, a number of federal agencies — including the FBI and IRS — are warning employers about new scams targeting employees’ direct deposit, W-2 and I-9 information. And these scams have wreaked havoc on scores of companies.

Here are three of the most problematic scams HR pros need to be aware of:

  1. Direct deposit information

The most recent warning for employers came from the FBI. It involves a phishing scam in which cybercriminals attempt to get employees to unwittingly provide the scammer access to the company’s self-service payroll platform.

In the version of the scam HR pros will be most interested in, a person pretending to be from the company’s HR department sends an email asking an employee to click on a link provided in the email and log into their self-service account.

The scammer will claim the employee must do this in order to:

  • view a confidential email from HR
  • view changes to the employee’s account, or
  • confirm that the account should not be deleted.

However, when the employee clicks on the link and enters the requested info, they’re actually providing info on their W-2 and paystub info. The scammer can then change the employee’s direct deposit instructions, and prevent detection by changing the email address used to notify the employee such changes were made.

Scammers may also change an employee’s passwords or other necessary credentials to keep the fraud from being discovered for as long as possible. In many cases, employers aren’t aware of anything until they hear from workers that their wages aren’t being deposited.

To prevent falling victim to this scam, the FBI is warning employers to:

  • Train employees to watch for phishing attacks and suspicious malware links. Checking the actual e-mail address rather than just looking at the display name can be crucial to spotting the attack early.
  • HR self-service platforms should have two-factor authentication. For example, users can be required to enter a second password that is e-mailed to them or a hard token code.
  • Set up alerts on self-service platforms for administrators so that unusual activity may be caught before money is lost. Alerts may be triggered for when banking information is changed to online bank accounts typically used by fraudsters.
  • Set a time delay between when direct deposit information is changed in the self-service portal and the actual deposit of funds into the new account to decrease the chance of the theft of funds.

Stay Vigilant.

TOP 10 EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS

complaiint

Are you interested in discovering your employees’ most serious complaints? Knowing what makes employees unhappy is half the battle when you think about employee work satisfaction, morale, positive motivation, and retention. Listen to employees and provide opportunities for them to communicate with company managers. If employees feel safe, they will tell you what’s on their minds. Your work culture must foster trust for successful two-way communication.

I had fun analying recurring themes in employee surveys and compiled the following top ten list. These are the items employees consistently complain about on surveys and in interviews. How many are true in your workplace?

  • Higher salaries:pay is the number one area in which employees seek change. You can foster a work environment in which employees feel comfortable asking for a raise.

 

  • Internal pay equity:employees are concerned particularly with pay compression, the differential in pay between new and longer term employees. In organizations, with the average annual pay increase for employees around 4%, employees perceive that newcomers are better paid – and, often, they are.

 

  • Benefits programs, particularly health and dental insurance, retirement, and Paid Time Off / vacation days:specifically, many employees feel that their health insurance costs too much, especially prescription drug programs, when employers pass part of their rising costs to employees.

 

  • Over-management:Employees often defined by interviewees as: “Too many chiefs, not enough Indians.” Workplaces that foster employee empowerment, employee enablement, and broader spans of control by managers, will see fewer complaints. A popular word, micromanaging, expresses this sentiment, too.

 

  • Pay increase guidelines for merit:Employees believe the compensation system should place greater emphasis on merit and contribution. Employees find pay systems in which all employees receive the same pay increase annually, demoralizing. Such pay systems hit the motivation and commitment of your best employees hardest as they may begin asking what’s in this for me ?As you adopt a merit pay system, one component is education so that employees know what behaviors and contributions merit additional compensation. Employees who did not must be informed by their manager about how their performance needs to change to merit a larger pay increase.

 

  • Human Resources department response to employees:The Human Resource department needs to be more responsive to employee questions and concerns. In many companies, the HR department is perceived as the policy making, policing arm of management. In fact, in forward thinking HR departments, responsiveness to employee needs is one of the cornerstones.

 

  • Favoritism:Employees want the perception that each employee is treated equivalently with other employees. If there are policies, behavioral guidelines, methods for requesting time off, valued assignments, opportunities for development, frequent communication, and just about any other work related decisions you can think of, employees want fair treatment.

 

  • Communication and availability:Let’s face it. Employees want face-to-face communication time with both their supervisors and executive management. This communication helps them feel recognized and important. And, yes, your time is full because you have a job, too. But, a manager’s main job is to support the success of all his or her reporting employees. That’s how the manager magnifies their own success.

 

  • Workloads are too heavy:Departments are understaffed and employees feel as if their workloads are too heavy and their time is spread too thinly. I see this complaint becoming worse as layoffs; the economy; your ability to find educated, skilled, experienced staff; and your business demands grow. To combat this, each company should help employees participate in continuous improvement activities.

 

  • Facility cleanliness:Employees want a clean, organized work environment in which they have the necessary equipment to perform well.

 

Thank You For Visiting

Thanks for joining me!

Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.— General George Patton

Mr. Marijan Pavisic is  Multifaceted, growth-driven, and dynamic executive, with broad-based experience in human resources management within diverse and expansive workforce organizations.

Skilled in employee relations, union dealings, recruitment, as well as strategic planning and implementation.  Experienced in employment and immigration laws and regulations. Proficient in Domestic and International labor laws and E-Verify.

Highly commended for overseeing regulatory compliance, staff training, and corporate human resources operations. Excelled at formulating and implementing innovative recruitment strategies and leadership development programs to effect dramatic improvements in efficiency, productivity, and business processes toward successful attainment of organizational goals and objectives.

Hands-on manager with outstanding leadership, interpersonal, problem resolution, and relationship-building skills.  Enjoy challenges and capable to multitask in fiercely competitive and fast-paced environment.

Fluent in German, Croatian, and English,currently working on Spanish communication abilities.

HR - Human resources development concept in word tag cloud

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